Have You Got The Bottle?

It’s plain to see throughout the media that we have become aware of how much damage plastics are doing to our environment. But what are we really doing about it?
Thanks to an up ward trend in health consciousness in the UK, and therefore the need to stay hydrated, we have created a bottled water industry in excess of £2.4 billion. With more than 20% of the UK drinking bottled water every day, that’s more than 7 billion single use plastic water bottles discarded every year. In 2017, bottled water outsold Coca Cola – we are talking here about water, not the new trend in flavoured Gin.

As part of his own crusade against single use plastics, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has tried to take on this multi billion pound industry by proving to the the general pubic – that’s you and me – that the UK’s drinking water from the household tap has the same and in some cases a better mineral content than the bottled water with a fancy label. Think about it for a moment, we are being asked to pay anything from £1 to £2 for a 500ml bottle of water, when we have, thanks to our local water authorities, a nigh on endless supply at the turn of a tap.

Then there’s that empty bottle, it takes about 400 years for it to decompose if it’s just discarded into the countryside – let’s face it, we’ve all seen these in hedgerows, floating on our rivers and canals, rolling down the street on a windy day.

Part of Hugh’s task has been to get petrol stations to provide a means to refill our bottles. Maybe if we all followed suit and requested this more often when we are out then it could become the norm. I don’t for one minute think that we are going to stop the sales of plastic wrapped water overnight. Nor do I think that it has to be banished completely, I’m sure there will always be circumstances where plastic bottles will be the only option to supply us with water (although I can’t think of any off hand).

There is a far bigger picture here than just single use plastic water bottles, in a world that is producing plastic faster than we can recycle it, it’s gradually entering our food chain in the form of microplastic particles directly affecting our health. This we will cover at a later date, for now however, we should narrow the focus down to our own individual usage. We could start by acquiring a suitable reusable drinking vessel and start taking advantage of sites like this https://refill.org.uk/ where businesses are already signing up to put their ‘Tap on the Map’.
Another company https://www.hydrachill.com/ is trying to supply machines to gyms etcetera, that dispense a reusable bottle that you pay for and then fill it with water. But there’s no getting away from the fact that while we as the consumers buy our water in plastic bottles, there will always be someone there willing to part us from our cash to sell us something we already have.acquiringThere is a far bigger picture here than just single use plastic water bottles, in a world that is producing plastic faster than we can recycle it, it’s gradually entering our food chain in the form of microplastic particles directly affecting our health. This we will cover at a later date, for now however, we should narrow the focus down to our own individual usage. We could start by purchasing a suitable reusable drinking vessel and start taking advantage of sites like this https://refill.org.uk/ where businesses are already signing up to put their ‘Tap on the Map’.
Another company https://www.hydrachill.com/ is trying to supply machines to gyms etcetera, that dispense a reusable bottle that you pay for and then fill it with water. But there’s no getting away from the fact that while we as the consumers buy our water in plastic bottles, there will always be someone there willing to part us from our cash to sell us something we already have.

Food for thought….

FoodRatings

Once again Britain win an award for unadulterated stupidity… I ask you, “where is it safe to eat….?”
I ask this after watching a program on food inspectors from the Safety Standards Agency as they allowed us to follow them around various eating venues. From the facade of the plush dining areas and shop fronts, taking us into the vile depths of what they laughably call the kitchens from where the dubious chefs and cooks prepared food and then serve up to the unsuspecting public to consume.

Demonstrating just how easily for us to catch E coli by contaminating a knife used on meat then using it to created a simple salad sandwich without washing it in between. The potential of causing total kidney failure and then a long fight to get back to health.

On display was filth and grime and a total lack of cleanliness in conditions that had encouraged rats and mice. There was grease on the floors and walls, discarded food left in the open on the worktops and again on the floor.  After collecting numerous marks against their check, the inspector fails to give any rating their Food Hygiene Rating, or health & safety, let alone hygiene…. telling the owner of the establishment that it isn’t fit to process food. So with the mounting possibility of poisoning a unwitting consumer, did he close them down, forcing a clean up? Nope, he let them continue to trade for a couple of weeks before his return to reassess the situation. The public completely unaware of the horrors behind the door to the kitchen….is it just me, should they not just close these dirty bastards down?
…. so I asked again “where is it safe to eat?” Well in an aid to help I have given a link below for the Food Hygiene Agency Ratings, might be worth a check of where you’re eating before you eat.

http://ratings.food.gov.uk/

Cricket “Fun”draiser

CricketJune16-5-2Cricket has never been on my top ten list of sports, as I find it difficult to categorize a summer game in which you have to wear a jumper, as a sport. However, imagine my surprise after attending a fund raising event at a local cricket ground in Broughton Astley, that I enjoyed the whole afternoon and despite the weather trying to dampen the spirits of the participants, all had a good time and the beer tent was busy. The main event was a 6-a-side tournament played by the men. The 12 wan-a-be Joe Roots fought it out while the rest of us enjoyed something from the BBQ washed down with a chilled beverage. Then it was the turn of the women, brandishing their bats like good rounders players do, throwing them backwards to the unsuspecting wicket keeper as they took flight. So another drink and more socializing while they sorted the winners. I have no idea who did win, but I have come to the conclusion that this is the way forward, with ‘fun’d raising events that involve beer.